Hotel waitress loses baby after she was pushed by Mugabe's son


A waitress suffered a miscarriage after she was pushed by Robert Mugabe jnr as he fled his mother Grace Mugabe's violent attack at a Sandton hotel on Sunday.

According to Timeslive, the waitress at Capital 20 West was delivering food when Robert jnr ran past her and pushed her out of the way. The woman fell to the ground and was rushed to hospital, where she later lost her baby.

A hotel employee reportedly confirmed the incident.

"She was not hit by Grace. It was Robert jnr who pushed her out of the way as he ran away from his mother.

"Grace did hit staff members ... She was hitting everyone - her sons, their friends, the girls and staff members."

Another hotel staff member, who did not want to be named, said the waitress had been delivering food on that floor when she got caught in the fracas.

"There was a meeting between Grace Mugabe's people and the hotel's human resources people on Tuesday," he said.

Garnet Basson, chief operating officer at The Capital Hotel Group, did not confirm or deny the incident, but said: "We are handling this thing internally. Please respect that. We will decide on how to deal with this matter going forward.

"It's the staff member's privacy that we must respect. I can assure you that we are doing everything in all aspects to ensure that we follow the necessary steps.”

A source said Grace also assaulted a manager at the hotel.

It appears Grace is set to get a free pass from the South African government, with little chance that she will face charges after the highly publicised rampage.

President Jacob Zuma's administration has buckled under pressure from the Zimbabwean government and other countries in the Southern African Development Community region, and is likely to give diplomatic immunity to Grace.

South African government sources said relations with neighbouring states were the main consideration.

A week of chaos and recriminations, which began with Grace assaulting local model Gabriella Engels with an electrical cord, ended with the two countries on the brink of a full-blown diplomatic row as they blocked each other's flights.

Highly placed government sources dealing with the diplomatic fallout said Grace was likely to be granted immunity from prosecution following high-level discussions among several government departments.

Several sources said the decision was influenced by the need to protect political stability and trade relations in the SADC region after several other regional countries applied political pressure on South Africa on the sidelines of the regional body's 37th summit that ends in Pretoria today.

Discussions were still ongoing late yesterday between the departments of international relations, justice and police, the Presidency and the State Security Agency. The dominant view was that Grace should be granted immunity.


"She will get it because if we don't, this thing will have an impact on the relations between the two countries and the rest of the region. The other countries in the region are also working with us," said a senior government official close to the discussions.

Timeslive

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